"full monty" meaning in English

See full monty in All languages combined

Adjective

Etymology: Unknown. First appeared in print in 1980s, but probably existed before that. The most common theory for its origin is that a purchase (especially that of a full three-piece suit) from Montague Maurice Burton (1885–1952), founder of Burton Menswear, was known as a "full Monty". According to the OED, this etymology is "perhaps the most plausible". The nudity definition comes via the movie The Full Monty, in which it is used as a euphemism for removing all one's clothes when stripping. Etymology templates: {{unk|en}} Unknown Head templates: {{en-adj|-}} full monty (not comparable)
  1. (Britain, colloquial) Nude Tags: Britain, colloquial, not-comparable
    Sense id: full_monty-en-adj-or.NMSkk Categories (other): British English

Noun

Etymology: Unknown. First appeared in print in 1980s, but probably existed before that. The most common theory for its origin is that a purchase (especially that of a full three-piece suit) from Montague Maurice Burton (1885–1952), founder of Burton Menswear, was known as a "full Monty". According to the OED, this etymology is "perhaps the most plausible". The nudity definition comes via the movie The Full Monty, in which it is used as a euphemism for removing all one's clothes when stripping. Etymology templates: {{unk|en}} Unknown Head templates: {{en-noun|~|full monties}} full monty (countable and uncountable, plural full monties) Forms: full monties [plural]
  1. (Britain, colloquial, countable) Everything; the whole package. Tags: Britain, colloquial, countable
    Sense id: full_monty-en-noun-wQwbYPRs Categories (other): British English Synonyms: everything
  2. (Britain, colloquial) Nudity. Tags: Britain, colloquial, countable, uncountable
    Sense id: full_monty-en-noun-T4IS.-Q2 Categories (other): British English

Inflected forms

Download JSON data for full monty meaning in English (3.6kB)

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  "etymology_text": "Unknown. First appeared in print in 1980s, but probably existed before that. The most common theory for its origin is that a purchase (especially that of a full three-piece suit) from Montague Maurice Burton (1885–1952), founder of Burton Menswear, was known as a \"full Monty\". According to the OED, this etymology is \"perhaps the most plausible\". The nudity definition comes via the movie The Full Monty, in which it is used as a euphemism for removing all one's clothes when stripping.",
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        {
          "text": "I thought he was only going to buy the basic kit, but he bought the full monty.",
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        "Everything; the whole package."
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        "(Britain, colloquial, countable) Everything; the whole package."
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        {
          "ref": "2002, Gene Amole, The Last Chapter: Gene Amole on Dying, Big Earth Publishing →ISBN, page 153",
          "text": "It is just as well the letter was tightly sealed, because there were photographs in it showing me and others in Full Monty. That is to say we were all buck naked."
        }
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        "Nudity."
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          "ref": "2008, George McClendon, Heaven's Call to Earthy Spirituality, Dog Ear Publishing →ISBN, page 63",
          "text": "Becoming male strippers and appearing full monty provides the connection."
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        {
          "ref": "2009, Sandra Hill, Viking Heat, Penguin →ISBN",
          "text": "Her breasts were always a surprise to men the first time she went full monty. Because she was so tall and slim and athletic, they probably expected pancakes."
        },
        {
          "ref": "2012, Eric Jerome Dickey, An Accidental Affair, Penguin →ISBN",
          "text": "And she went full monty on film and everything has gone pear shaped for her."
        }
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        "(Britain, colloquial) Nude"
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  "word": "full monty"
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          "text": "It is just as well the letter was tightly sealed, because there were photographs in it showing me and others in Full Monty. That is to say we were all buck naked."
        }
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        {
          "ref": "2008, George McClendon, Heaven's Call to Earthy Spirituality, Dog Ear Publishing →ISBN, page 63",
          "text": "Becoming male strippers and appearing full monty provides the connection."
        },
        {
          "ref": "2009, Sandra Hill, Viking Heat, Penguin →ISBN",
          "text": "Her breasts were always a surprise to men the first time she went full monty. Because she was so tall and slim and athletic, they probably expected pancakes."
        },
        {
          "ref": "2012, Eric Jerome Dickey, An Accidental Affair, Penguin →ISBN",
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        }
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  "word": "full monty"
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This page is a part of the kaikki.org machine-readable English dictionary. This dictionary is based on structured data extracted on 2022-01-20 from the enwiktionary dump dated 2022-01-01 using wiktextract. The data shown on this site has been post-processed and various details (e.g., extra categories) removed, some information disambiguated, and additional data merged from other sources. See the raw data download page for the unprocessed wiktextract data.