"Yuletide" meaning in All languages combined

See Yuletide on Wiktionary

Noun [English]

IPA: /ˈjuːlˌtaɪd/ [Received-Pronunciation], /ˈjulˌtaɪd/ [General-American] Audio: en-au-Yuletide.ogg [Australia]
Etymology: 1912 Yuletide and New Year card, from the collection of the Missouri History Museum in St. Louis, Missouri, USA]] From Yule (from Middle English yole, from Old English ġeōl, ġeōla (“Christmastide, midwinter”), either cognate with or from Old Norse jól (“midwinter season, yule”), from Proto-Germanic *jehwlą (“celebration, festivity; yule”), perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *yekə- (“joke, play”)) + -tide (“period around a holiday”) (from Old English tīd (“period, season, time; feast-day, festal-tide”), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dī- (“time”)). Etymology templates: {{circa2|1912|short=yes}} c. 1912, {{m|en|Yule}} Yule, {{inh|en|enm|yole}} Middle English yole, {{inh|en|ang|ġeōl}} Old English ġeōl, {{m|ang|ġeōla||Christmastide, midwinter}} ġeōla (“Christmastide, midwinter”), {{glossary|cognate}} cognate, {{der|en|non|jól||midwinter season, yule}} Old Norse jól (“midwinter season, yule”), {{der|en|gem-pro|*jehwlą||celebration, festivity; yule}} Proto-Germanic *jehwlą (“celebration, festivity; yule”), {{der|en|ine-pro|*yekə-||joke, play}} Proto-Indo-European *yekə- (“joke, play”), {{suffix|en||tide|t2=period around a holiday}} + -tide (“period around a holiday”), {{der|en|ang|tīd||period, season, time; feast-day, festal-tide}} Old English tīd (“period, season, time; feast-day, festal-tide”), {{der|en|ine-pro|*dī-||time}} Proto-Indo-European *dī- (“time”) Head templates: {{en-noun|~}} Yuletide (countable and uncountable, plural Yuletides) Forms: Yuletides [plural]
  1. (dated) The period around Christmas; the Christmas season, Christmastime; specifically, Christmas itself. Tags: countable, dated, uncountable Categories (topical): Christmas
    Sense id: Yuletide-en-noun-YLzYWFHE Disambiguation of Christmas: 65 18 17 Categories (other): English terms suffixed with -tide Disambiguation of English terms suffixed with -tide: 50 27 23 Synonyms (Christmas season): Christmastide (english: one sense) Disambiguation of 'Christmas season': 85 8 7
  2. (dated, or Germanic Neo-Paganism) The period of celebration of a pre-Christian festival associated with the (northern) winter solstice, later absorbed into the festival of Christmas (but sometimes recreated by modern neo-pagans). Tags: countable, dated, uncountable
    Sense id: Yuletide-en-noun-olshkllp
  3. (Australia, regional) The period of southern winter in the middle of the year, sometimes celebrated in the colder, snowy regions of Australia with allusions to Christmas, which originated as a marketing gimmick. Tags: Australia, countable, regional, uncountable
    Sense id: Yuletide-en-noun-6G.eueqs Categories (other): Australian English, Regional English

Inflected forms

Alternative forms

Download JSON data for Yuletide meaning in All languages combined (8.2kB)

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  "etymology_templates": [
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      "args": {
        "1": "1912",
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      "expansion": "c. 1912",
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    }
  ],
  "etymology_text": "1912 Yuletide and New Year card, from the collection of the Missouri History Museum in St. Louis, Missouri, USA]]\nFrom Yule (from Middle English yole, from Old English ġeōl, ġeōla (“Christmastide, midwinter”), either cognate with or from Old Norse jól (“midwinter season, yule”), from Proto-Germanic *jehwlą (“celebration, festivity; yule”), perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *yekə- (“joke, play”)) + -tide (“period around a holiday”) (from Old English tīd (“period, season, time; feast-day, festal-tide”), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dī- (“time”)).",
  "forms": [
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      "form": "Yuletides",
      "tags": [
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  "head_templates": [
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      "args": {
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      "expansion": "Yuletide (countable and uncountable, plural Yuletides)",
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  "lang": "English",
  "lang_code": "en",
  "pos": "noun",
  "senses": [
    {
      "categories": [
        {
          "_dis": "50 27 23",
          "kind": "other",
          "name": "English terms suffixed with -tide",
          "parents": [],
          "source": "w+disamb"
        },
        {
          "_dis": "65 18 17",
          "kind": "topical",
          "langcode": "en",
          "name": "Christmas",
          "orig": "en:Christmas",
          "parents": [
            "Christianity",
            "Holidays",
            "Abrahamism",
            "Religion",
            "Calendar terms",
            "List of sets",
            "Culture",
            "Timekeeping",
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          "source": "w+disamb"
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      "examples": [
        {
          "ref": "1862, modified from Thomas Oliphant's original, “Deck the Halls”, in Jerry Snyder’s Easy Chord Christmas Guitar Book, Miami Beach, Fla.: Hansen House, published [19—?], OCLC 6529065, page 17",
          "text": "Deck the halls with boughs of holly, / Fa la la la la la la la la! / 'Tis the season to be jolly, / Fa la la la la la la la la! / Don we now our gay apparel, / Fa la la la la la la la la! / Troll the ancient yuletide carol, / Fa la la la la la la la la!",
          "type": "quotation"
        },
        {
          "ref": "1922 February, James Joyce, “[Episode 17: Ithaca]”, in Ulysses, London: The Egoist Press, published October 1922, OCLC 2297483, part III [Nostos], page 673",
          "text": "What did the first locked drawer contain? […] a Yuletide card, bearing on it a pictorial representation of a parasitic plant, the legend Mizpah, the date Xmas 1892, the name of the senders: from Mr and Mrs M. Comerford, the versicle: May this Yuletide bring to thee, Joy and peace and welcome glee: […]",
          "type": "quotation"
        },
        {
          "ref": "1986, \"Weird Al\" Yankovic (lyrics and music), “Christmas at Ground Zero”, in Polka Party!",
          "text": "It's Christmas at ground zero / Just seconds left to go / I'll duck and cover / With my Yuletide lover / Underneath the mistletoe",
          "type": "quotation"
        }
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        "The period around Christmas; the Christmas season, Christmastime; specifically, Christmas itself."
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        "(dated) The period around Christmas; the Christmas season, Christmastime; specifically, Christmas itself."
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          "word": "Christmastide"
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        {
          "ref": "1902 October, Henry van Dyke [Jr.], “The First Christmas-tree”, in The Blue Flower, New York, N.Y.: Charles Scribner's Sons, OCLC 1001566549, section II, page 277",
          "text": "For this is the Yuletide, and the heathen people of the forest are gathered at the thunder-oak of Geismar to worship their god, Thor.",
          "type": "quotation"
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        {
          "ref": "1923 October, H[oward] P[hillips] Lovecraft, “The Festival”, in Weird Tales, volume 5, number 1, Indianapolis, Ind.: Popular Fiction Pub. Co., published January 1925; reprinted in Lin Carter, editor, The Doom that Came to Sarnath, New York, N.Y.: Del Rey Books, Ballantine Books, February 1971 (May 1991 printing), page 95",
          "text": "It was the Yuletide, that men call Christmas though they know in their hearts it is older than Bethlehem and Babylon, older than Memphis and mankind. It was the Yuletide, and I had come at last to the ancient sea town where my people had dwelt and kept festival in the elder time when festival was forbidden; where also they had commanded their sons to keep festival once every century, that the memory of primal secrets might not be forgotten.",
          "type": "quotation"
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        {
          "ref": "2010, Lee Atkinson; Ron Crittall; Marc Llewellyn; Lee Mylne, “New South Wales”, in Emil J. Ross, editor, Frommer’s Australia 2010, Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley Publishing, page 186",
          "text": "Note that the colder winter months (June–Aug) are the busiest season. This period is known as Yuletide—the locals' version of the Christmas period, when most places offer traditional Christmas dinners and roaring log fires.",
          "type": "quotation"
        }
      ],
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        "The period of southern winter in the middle of the year, sometimes celebrated in the colder, snowy regions of Australia with allusions to Christmas, which originated as a marketing gimmick."
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      "id": "Yuletide-en-noun-6G.eueqs",
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        "(Australia, regional) The period of southern winter in the middle of the year, sometimes celebrated in the colder, snowy regions of Australia with allusions to Christmas, which originated as a marketing gimmick."
      ],
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      "ipa": "/ˈjuːlˌtaɪd/",
      "tags": [
        "Received-Pronunciation"
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  "word": "Yuletide"
}
{
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    "English terms derived from Proto-Indo-European",
    "English terms inherited from Middle English",
    "English terms inherited from Old English",
    "English terms suffixed with -tide",
    "English terms with IPA pronunciation",
    "English terms with audio links",
    "English uncountable nouns",
    "Requests for review of Spanish translations",
    "en:Christmas"
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        "4": "Christmastide, midwinter"
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      "name": "der"
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    {
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      },
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      "name": "der"
    }
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  "etymology_text": "1912 Yuletide and New Year card, from the collection of the Missouri History Museum in St. Louis, Missouri, USA]]\nFrom Yule (from Middle English yole, from Old English ġeōl, ġeōla (“Christmastide, midwinter”), either cognate with or from Old Norse jól (“midwinter season, yule”), from Proto-Germanic *jehwlą (“celebration, festivity; yule”), perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *yekə- (“joke, play”)) + -tide (“period around a holiday”) (from Old English tīd (“period, season, time; feast-day, festal-tide”), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dī- (“time”)).",
  "forms": [
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      "form": "Yuletides",
      "tags": [
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      "args": {
        "1": "~"
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      "expansion": "Yuletide (countable and uncountable, plural Yuletides)",
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  "lang_code": "en",
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      "examples": [
        {
          "ref": "1862, modified from Thomas Oliphant's original, “Deck the Halls”, in Jerry Snyder’s Easy Chord Christmas Guitar Book, Miami Beach, Fla.: Hansen House, published [19—?], OCLC 6529065, page 17",
          "text": "Deck the halls with boughs of holly, / Fa la la la la la la la la! / 'Tis the season to be jolly, / Fa la la la la la la la la! / Don we now our gay apparel, / Fa la la la la la la la la! / Troll the ancient yuletide carol, / Fa la la la la la la la la!",
          "type": "quotation"
        },
        {
          "ref": "1922 February, James Joyce, “[Episode 17: Ithaca]”, in Ulysses, London: The Egoist Press, published October 1922, OCLC 2297483, part III [Nostos], page 673",
          "text": "What did the first locked drawer contain? […] a Yuletide card, bearing on it a pictorial representation of a parasitic plant, the legend Mizpah, the date Xmas 1892, the name of the senders: from Mr and Mrs M. Comerford, the versicle: May this Yuletide bring to thee, Joy and peace and welcome glee: […]",
          "type": "quotation"
        },
        {
          "ref": "1986, \"Weird Al\" Yankovic (lyrics and music), “Christmas at Ground Zero”, in Polka Party!",
          "text": "It's Christmas at ground zero / Just seconds left to go / I'll duck and cover / With my Yuletide lover / Underneath the mistletoe",
          "type": "quotation"
        }
      ],
      "glosses": [
        "The period around Christmas; the Christmas season, Christmastime; specifically, Christmas itself."
      ],
      "raw_glosses": [
        "(dated) The period around Christmas; the Christmas season, Christmastime; specifically, Christmas itself."
      ],
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        "dated",
        "uncountable"
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      "english": "or Germanic Neo-Paganism",
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        {
          "ref": "1902 October, Henry van Dyke [Jr.], “The First Christmas-tree”, in The Blue Flower, New York, N.Y.: Charles Scribner's Sons, OCLC 1001566549, section II, page 277",
          "text": "For this is the Yuletide, and the heathen people of the forest are gathered at the thunder-oak of Geismar to worship their god, Thor.",
          "type": "quotation"
        },
        {
          "ref": "1923 October, H[oward] P[hillips] Lovecraft, “The Festival”, in Weird Tales, volume 5, number 1, Indianapolis, Ind.: Popular Fiction Pub. Co., published January 1925; reprinted in Lin Carter, editor, The Doom that Came to Sarnath, New York, N.Y.: Del Rey Books, Ballantine Books, February 1971 (May 1991 printing), page 95",
          "text": "It was the Yuletide, that men call Christmas though they know in their hearts it is older than Bethlehem and Babylon, older than Memphis and mankind. It was the Yuletide, and I had come at last to the ancient sea town where my people had dwelt and kept festival in the elder time when festival was forbidden; where also they had commanded their sons to keep festival once every century, that the memory of primal secrets might not be forgotten.",
          "type": "quotation"
        }
      ],
      "glosses": [
        "The period of celebration of a pre-Christian festival associated with the (northern) winter solstice, later absorbed into the festival of Christmas (but sometimes recreated by modern neo-pagans)."
      ],
      "raw_glosses": [
        "(dated, or Germanic Neo-Paganism) The period of celebration of a pre-Christian festival associated with the (northern) winter solstice, later absorbed into the festival of Christmas (but sometimes recreated by modern neo-pagans)."
      ],
      "tags": [
        "countable",
        "dated",
        "uncountable"
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    },
    {
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        "English terms with quotations",
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        {
          "ref": "2010, Lee Atkinson; Ron Crittall; Marc Llewellyn; Lee Mylne, “New South Wales”, in Emil J. Ross, editor, Frommer’s Australia 2010, Hoboken, N.J.: Wiley Publishing, page 186",
          "text": "Note that the colder winter months (June–Aug) are the busiest season. This period is known as Yuletide—the locals' version of the Christmas period, when most places offer traditional Christmas dinners and roaring log fires.",
          "type": "quotation"
        }
      ],
      "glosses": [
        "The period of southern winter in the middle of the year, sometimes celebrated in the colder, snowy regions of Australia with allusions to Christmas, which originated as a marketing gimmick."
      ],
      "raw_glosses": [
        "(Australia, regional) The period of southern winter in the middle of the year, sometimes celebrated in the colder, snowy regions of Australia with allusions to Christmas, which originated as a marketing gimmick."
      ],
      "tags": [
        "Australia",
        "countable",
        "regional",
        "uncountable"
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    }
  ],
  "sounds": [
    {
      "ipa": "/ˈjuːlˌtaɪd/",
      "tags": [
        "Received-Pronunciation"
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    },
    {
      "ipa": "/ˈjulˌtaɪd/",
      "tags": [
        "General-American"
      ]
    },
    {
      "audio": "en-au-Yuletide.ogg",
      "mp3_url": "https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/transcoded/6/6b/En-au-Yuletide.ogg/En-au-Yuletide.ogg.mp3",
      "ogg_url": "https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/6/6b/En-au-Yuletide.ogg",
      "tags": [
        "Australia"
      ],
      "text": "Audio (AU)"
    }
  ],
  "synonyms": [
    {
      "english": "one sense",
      "sense": "Christmas season",
      "word": "Christmastide"
    }
  ],
  "wikipedia": [
    "Missouri History Museum"
  ],
  "word": "Yuletide"
}

This page is a part of the kaikki.org machine-readable All languages combined dictionary. This dictionary is based on structured data extracted on 2022-10-03 from the enwiktionary dump dated 2022-10-01 using wiktextract.

If you use this data in academic research, please cite Tatu Ylonen: Wiktextract: Wiktionary as Machine-Readable Structured Data, Proceedings of the 13th Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC), pp. 1317-1325, Marseille, 20-25 June 2022. Linking to the relevant page(s) under https://kaikki.org would also be greatly appreciated.

The data shown on this site has been post-processed and various details (e.g., extra categories) removed, some information disambiguated, and additional data merged from other sources. See the raw data download page for the unprocessed wiktextract data.